Love Letters & Peacock Feathers

Wisdom.. From thy Unwise Queen herself.

Don’t just fuck the police.

Take the police on a romantic dinner date, and really win them over.  Over the course of the next few months, slowly win the absolute affection of the police.  Make the police fall in love with you, make the police unable to imagine life without you.  Eventually, once your relationship has reached the apex of perfection, tenderly make love to the police.  Make the police want you.  No.  Make the police need you.  Then move away and never call again.

(Source: ramblesrantsandraunchyrandomness, via loveletterspeacockfeathers)

loveletterspeacockfeathers:

“Maybe some women aren’t meant to be tamed. Maybe they just need to run free til they find someone just as wild to run with them.”

loveletterspeacockfeathers:

“Maybe some women aren’t meant to be tamed. Maybe they just need to run free til they find someone just as wild to run with them.”

loveletterspeacockfeathers:

This is the true love story which came straight out of Nashville and became known as the best love story coming out of the American entertainment business. Both Johnny Cash and June Carter were already married to other people when they met. They performed together on stage, traveled together and developed a deep bond of friendship.

During Johnny’s country music career, he became addicted to drugs and alcohol. In his greatest time of need, his wife pretty much deserted him. But his best friend, June, stuck by his side through his most difficult times. Both of their marriages had failed. And one day, on stage and in front of a live audience, Johnny proposed to June. With a tearful acceptance, she agreed to marry him, her best friend. He had actually proposed to her 30 times before that night on stage when she finally said yes!

Throughout their marriage of 35 wonderful years, Johnny fell back into drugs and alcohol a number of times. But their love endured. June would not leave his side, even when the going got tough. When most people would have left, she stuck around. And because she stayed loyal to him through the hard and rough times and through his addictions, he loved her even more for it. Johnny Cash did have a great music career. He won eight Grammies. Seven of them were won after he married June.

In 2002, Johnny Cash remade the Nine Inch Nails song Hurt and released a video. For him, the song and video was a monument to his years of drug abuse and life pitfalls. In his video, which you can find here on YouTube, it shows a dramatic emotional voyage leading up to his last days on earth. He dedicated this work to his wife, June, who is also shown in the video. Two months after the taping of Hurt, June Carter passed away. Johnny Carter died just a few months after her death. This video won best video of the year at the Grammys and at the Country Music Awards.

Before you know it it’s 3 am and you’re 80 years old and you can’t remember what it was like to have 20 year old thoughts or a 10 year old heart.

—Unknown  (via wistly)

Never Grow Up ~ it’s a trap.

(Source: anitaspallenberg, via i--swear--we--are--infinite)

You’d be surprised what lengths people will go to not to face what’s real and painful inside them.

—My Mad Fat Diary (via psych-facts)

Sometimes you just have to die a little inside in order to be reborn and rise again as a stronger and wiser version of you…

—Quotediary.me (via psych-facts)

I’m sorry that I’m both your umbrella and the rain.

Tablo  (via psych-facts)

Maybe we have to break everything to make something better out of ourselves.

—Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club (via quotestuff)

(Source: bookmania, via psych-facts)

I’ve been here before a few times
And I’m quite aware we’re dying
And your hands they shake with goodbyes
And I’ll take you back if you’d have me
So here I am I’m trying
So here I am are you ready

Come on let me hold you touch you feel you
Always
Kiss you taste you all night
Always

And I’ll miss your laugh your smile
I’ll admit I’m wrong if you’d tell me
I’m so sick of fights I hate them
Lets start this again for real

So here I am I’m trying
So here I am are you ready
So here I am I’m trying
So here I am are you ready

Come on let me hold you touch you feel you
Always
Kiss you taste you all night
Always
Come on let me hold you touch you feel you
Always
Kiss you taste you all night
Always

I’ve been here before a few times
And I’m quite aware we’re dying

Come on let me hold you touch you feel you
Always
Kiss you taste you all night
Always
Come on let me hold you touch you feel you
Always
Kiss you taste you all night
Always

I’ve been here before a few times
And I’m quite aware we’re dying
And your hands they shake with goodbyes
And I’ll take you back if you’d have me
So here I am I’m trying
So here I am are you ready

Come on let me hold you touch you feel you
Always
Kiss you taste you all night
Always

And I’ll miss your laugh your smile
I’ll admit I’m wrong if you’d tell me
I’m so sick of fights I hate them
Lets start this again for real

So here I am I’m trying
So here I am are you ready
So here I am I’m trying
So here I am are you ready

Come on let me hold you touch you feel you
Always
Kiss you taste you all night
Always
Come on let me hold you touch you feel you
Always
Kiss you taste you all night
Always

I’ve been here before a few times
And I’m quite aware we’re dying

Come on let me hold you touch you feel you
Always
Kiss you taste you all night
Always
Come on let me hold you touch you feel you
Always
Kiss you taste you all night
Always

at Broadbeach Beach

at Broadbeach Beach

Myth goes that the Peacock guarding the gates to Paradise, ate the Devil, and that is how she managed to get inside. This myth makes a unity of the duality of good and evil, and also explains the bird’s mysterious iridescent color. It also incorporates the notion of the incorruptibility of the peacock. A standard made of peacock feathers used to indicate the presence of a 19th-century rajah, whose power is worldly. Peacocks are considered sacred in India, where its feathers are burnt to ward off disease, and even to cure snakebite.
The motif of two peacocks, one on each side of the Tree of Life, is a well-known feature of Persian decorative arts. A pair of peacocks stands for the “psychic duality of man” similar to the role played by the Gemini in western astrology. In the iconography of European alchemy and hermaneutics, the peacock represents the soul. In Christianity, it stands for immortality and the incorruptibility of the soul. In both the Hindu and the Buddhist traditions, the peacock’s influence is mainly in the realm of worldly appearance. Hence, the Mother-of-Buddhas, Mahamayuri-vidyarajni has a peacock as her vehicle.  Mayuri, known in Japan as Kujaku Myo-o, is the Buddhist wisdom deity associated with the peacock who protects against calamity especially drought. Skanda, one of the two sons of Indian god, Shiva, has a peacock for his mount. Lord of the elements of form, he is also a war god. In the Hindu tradition it is said that at the time of Creation of the universe, when the primordial poison was churned out of the Sea of Milk and transmuted into the amrita of immortality, it was a peacock that absorbed the negative effects. Thus the bird is thought of as a protector, though its flesh is consequently considered to be poisonous. Since a potentially deadly emotion such as anger is depicted as a serpent, and the peacock is immune, the peacock also symbolizes victory over poisonous tendencies in sentient beings. Peacock in the Poison Grove by Dharmarakshita, a Tibetan classic in translation, is a well-known text for training the mind. In the discourse, The Wheel of Sharp Weapons, another Buddhist treatise by Dharmarakshita, the peacock is credited with an ability to neutralize and use black aconite (aconitum ferox) as a nutriment. This highly toxic plant, also known as “wolf-bane,” is an important ingredient in traditional Asian medicine including that of Tibet. 
One of Green Tara’s many epithets is The Peahen.
Palden Lhamo, (pron. Penden Hamo, Skt. Shri Devi) the dark blue protector of all Tibetan Buddhist denominations who rides her mule through a burning [with wisdom] sea of blood [opportunity of life in the bodily form] is sheltered by a peacock-feather umbrella.
Lakshmi, wife of the Hindu god, Vishnu, sometimes is depicted with armbands in the form of peacocks. The birds are sacred to her since their cries are associated with the rainy season and hence, fertility. The hero of the Indian epic, Mahabharat is called Arjun, a name that refers to the peacock. Also, there is a north Nepali deity called Janguli who protects against snakebite and poisoning. Described as having 3 faces, 6 arms, her vehicle is, not surprisingly, a peacock. The peacock’s beautiful colouring is said to be a gift from the god, Indra. One day the Indra was doing battle with Ravana, the Demon King. The peacock, which in those days resembled his plain brown hen, took pity on Indra and raised its tail to form a blind or screen behind which Indra could hide. As a reward for this act of compassion, the bird was honored with the jewel-like blue-green plumage that it bears to this day.	
Krishna, the avatar of Vishnu who is “God-as-the-one-responding-to-devotion”, is also depicted in the company of peacocks.
The Amitabha association of this jewel-tone bird with its sun-like fan of a tail evocative of the Wheel of Dharma, Buddha’s teachings; its connection to the ideas of immortality and compassion, and the unification of views or opposites, as well as the correspondence with the Garden which is the Pure Land, demonstrates in Mahayana Buddhism the archetypical nature of the relationship between the peacock and Amitabha. In the depiction of Buddha of Eternal Light, he is seated under a tree; we see its flowers and leaves peeking through the pavilion. Tenga Rinpoche says, “birds, in particular, have strong desire and craving, so, as a symbol of craving transformed into discriminating wisdom, Amitabha’s throne is supported by peacocks” There are actually eight peacocks that support Amitabha’s throne, one at each corner of the base. They stand for the idea that no matter the misdeeds committed during one’s lifetime[s], rebirth is possible in Sukhavati, the Pure Land of Great Bliss that is the Western Paradise of Opameh [Tibetan for Amitabha] Six peacock feathers arranged as a fan and sprinkling utensil used for distributing the blessing or purifying water in Tibetan Buddhist empowerments and other rituals. In this role they are not only a symbol of compassion, but also a symbol of immortality by virtue of their capacity to absorb and neutralize, and to act as a universal antidote against poisons including the kleshas [imperfections or obscurations] such as anger, greed and ignorance that are inherently human

Myth goes that the Peacock guarding the gates to Paradise, ate the Devil, and that is how she managed to get inside. This myth makes a unity of the duality of good and evil, and also explains the bird’s mysterious iridescent color. It also incorporates the notion of the incorruptibility of the peacock. A standard made of peacock feathers used to indicate the presence of a 19th-century rajah, whose power is worldly. Peacocks are considered sacred in India, where its feathers are burnt to ward off disease, and even to cure snakebite.
The motif of two peacocks, one on each side of the Tree of Life, is a well-known feature of Persian decorative arts. A pair of peacocks stands for the “psychic duality of man” similar to the role played by the Gemini in western astrology. In the iconography of European alchemy and hermaneutics, the peacock represents the soul. In Christianity, it stands for immortality and the incorruptibility of the soul. In both the Hindu and the Buddhist traditions, the peacock’s influence is mainly in the realm of worldly appearance. Hence, the Mother-of-Buddhas, Mahamayuri-vidyarajni has a peacock as her vehicle. Mayuri, known in Japan as Kujaku Myo-o, is the Buddhist wisdom deity associated with the peacock who protects against calamity especially drought. Skanda, one of the two sons of Indian god, Shiva, has a peacock for his mount. Lord of the elements of form, he is also a war god. In the Hindu tradition it is said that at the time of Creation of the universe, when the primordial poison was churned out of the Sea of Milk and transmuted into the amrita of immortality, it was a peacock that absorbed the negative effects. Thus the bird is thought of as a protector, though its flesh is consequently considered to be poisonous. Since a potentially deadly emotion such as anger is depicted as a serpent, and the peacock is immune, the peacock also symbolizes victory over poisonous tendencies in sentient beings. Peacock in the Poison Grove by Dharmarakshita, a Tibetan classic in translation, is a well-known text for training the mind. In the discourse, The Wheel of Sharp Weapons, another Buddhist treatise by Dharmarakshita, the peacock is credited with an ability to neutralize and use black aconite (aconitum ferox) as a nutriment. This highly toxic plant, also known as “wolf-bane,” is an important ingredient in traditional Asian medicine including that of Tibet.
One of Green Tara’s many epithets is The Peahen.
Palden Lhamo, (pron. Penden Hamo, Skt. Shri Devi) the dark blue protector of all Tibetan Buddhist denominations who rides her mule through a burning [with wisdom] sea of blood [opportunity of life in the bodily form] is sheltered by a peacock-feather umbrella.
Lakshmi, wife of the Hindu god, Vishnu, sometimes is depicted with armbands in the form of peacocks. The birds are sacred to her since their cries are associated with the rainy season and hence, fertility. The hero of the Indian epic, Mahabharat is called Arjun, a name that refers to the peacock. Also, there is a north Nepali deity called Janguli who protects against snakebite and poisoning. Described as having 3 faces, 6 arms, her vehicle is, not surprisingly, a peacock. The peacock’s beautiful colouring is said to be a gift from the god, Indra. One day the Indra was doing battle with Ravana, the Demon King. The peacock, which in those days resembled his plain brown hen, took pity on Indra and raised its tail to form a blind or screen behind which Indra could hide. As a reward for this act of compassion, the bird was honored with the jewel-like blue-green plumage that it bears to this day.
Krishna, the avatar of Vishnu who is “God-as-the-one-responding-to-devotion”, is also depicted in the company of peacocks.
The Amitabha association of this jewel-tone bird with its sun-like fan of a tail evocative of the Wheel of Dharma, Buddha’s teachings; its connection to the ideas of immortality and compassion, and the unification of views or opposites, as well as the correspondence with the Garden which is the Pure Land, demonstrates in Mahayana Buddhism the archetypical nature of the relationship between the peacock and Amitabha. In the depiction of Buddha of Eternal Light, he is seated under a tree; we see its flowers and leaves peeking through the pavilion. Tenga Rinpoche says, “birds, in particular, have strong desire and craving, so, as a symbol of craving transformed into discriminating wisdom, Amitabha’s throne is supported by peacocks” There are actually eight peacocks that support Amitabha’s throne, one at each corner of the base. They stand for the idea that no matter the misdeeds committed during one’s lifetime[s], rebirth is possible in Sukhavati, the Pure Land of Great Bliss that is the Western Paradise of Opameh [Tibetan for Amitabha] Six peacock feathers arranged as a fan and sprinkling utensil used for distributing the blessing or purifying water in Tibetan Buddhist empowerments and other rituals. In this role they are not only a symbol of compassion, but also a symbol of immortality by virtue of their capacity to absorb and neutralize, and to act as a universal antidote against poisons including the kleshas [imperfections or obscurations] such as anger, greed and ignorance that are inherently human